Archive, CultureSo It Goes

Archive: Quentin Jones in Issue 5

Archive, CultureSo It Goes
Archive: Quentin Jones in Issue 5

This piece originally appeared in print in So It GoesIssue 5Spring 2015.

 

Animator, illustrator, artist and model, Quentin Jones has mastered the constant balancing act required of today’s creative multi-taskers with seeming ease. Between the art and fashion worlds, Jones has found a market in for her work to thrive, collecting clients like Chanel, Kenzo and Smythson, and receiving a commission to make a punchy, bondage-themed short video for Miley Cyrus’ last tour along the way.

She may be an artistic force of nature with a bold vision and aesthetic, but Jones herself is unassuming. A low-key tomboy with domestic tendencies, there are ephemera from various different projects splashed around her Camden flat. Having recently moved back to London after a spell in New York, her walls are unsurprisingly covered with a collection of photos, collages, art pieces and an unmissable hot-pink neon sign glowing ‘disney prince’.

Jones’ style is distinct – thick, black brushstrokes forcefully imposed on collaged images or incorporated in stop-motion films that invoke cartoonish qualities – and provides a refreshing counterpoint to the polish of traditional fashion imagery and illustration. “I think fashion is getting more and more digital, so people enjoy the tactile nature of my work. It feels real, while still existing online,” she says. When asked what originally inspired her to pursue collage while most of her peers were honing more traditional styles, her answer is simple – impatience.

Adult Series, 2014, mixed media, courtesy of the artist, originally published by Adult Magazine

Adult Series, 2014, mixed media, courtesy of the artist, originally published by Adult Magazine

Influenced by both Dadaism and Surrealism, Jones has been able to develop an original style that roams across different media. “I find painters are the reference points I visit most often. For film, the composition of a painting can give me an idea about how to edit a scene. Projects usually start with a brief, and I have it in mind as I absorb lots of other artists’ work. I then sit away from my computer with my sketchbook and scribble for a full day. The hard bit is translating those scribbles into something coherent that a client can understand or envisage.” For her favourite medium, Jones returns to what she initially became known for – traditional stop- motion film. “I crave making a film in the way I used to – shot with stills and not video footage,” she says.

Having studied philosophy at Cambridge and graphic design at Central Saint Martins, she’s has been able to channel two very different mindsets in her work. It is, as a result, less emotional and more responsive; an advantage in the ever- shifting digital realm, even as it returns to analogue media. Her current project is a fine example of this dichotomy: a handmade, 89-frame spinning zoetrope for the New is Now exhibition at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, opening in June.

 

Photographer: Quentin de Briey
Words: Anneliese Kristedja
Fashion Editor: Frances Davison
Stylist: Aradia Crockett

Hair: PhilippeTholimet @ Streeters using Oribe Haircare
Make-up: Kenny Leung @ Carol Hayes Management using Bobbi Brown

 

T-Shirt: R.E.V. by Rêve En Vert

T-Shirt: R.E.V. by Rêve En Vert

Jumper: Club Monaco;Trousers: Holly Fulton

Jumper: Club Monaco;Trousers: Holly Fulton